Category Archive: Graduate Researchers

Keith R. MacArthur, B.Sc.

MIT2 Laboratory Manager
Modeling & Simulation, Ph.D. Student
University of Central Florida
Institute for Simulation and Training
B.Sc. Psychology, University of Central Florida
Office: (407) 823-5560
keith.macarthur@knights.ucf.edu
Keith MacArthur CV

Keith, or Mac has he prefers, discovered the MIT2 laboratory through his undergraduate academic mentor, who subsequently introduced him to the laboratory manager at the time. Mac successfully completed and defended his undergraduate honors thesis on the deindividuation of automotive drivers in the Summer of 2014. He has since been given a post Baccalaureate internship with the laboratory where he has been promoted to the position of Laboratory Manager. His interests in academia and research include cognitive psychology, deception detection, and human factors.

Publications

Xan Kaplan, B.A.

Applied Experimental Human Factors, Ph.D. student
University of Central Florida
B.A. Psychology, New York University
ADKaplan@knights.ucf.edu

Alexandra ‘Xan’ Kaplan came to the MIT2 laboratory in the fall of 2016. She is a graduate student in the Applied Experimental Human Factors program, with research interests in human robot trust.

Tiffani Marlowe, M.S.

Modeling & Simulation M.S. Student
University of Central Florida
Institute for Simulation and Training
B.Sc. Psychology, University of Central Florida
M.S. Modeling & Simulation, University of Central Florida
tiffani_walker@knights.ucf.edu
Tiffani Marlowe CV
Tiffani’s research interests include: physiological measures, human performance, trust, human-robot interaction, training simulations and usability. She will be applying to a Human Factors Ph.D program when she completes her masters.

Publications

William ‘Billy’ Volante, B.Sc.

Applied Experimental Human Factors, Ph.D. student
University of Central Florida
B.Sc. Psychology, University of Central Florida
wgvolante@gmail.com
Billy Volante CV
William Volante began working in the MIT2 laboratory in 2014 as an undergraduate research assistant. Upon graduating from the University of Central Florida in 2015 with his degree in Psychology he has continued his research in the lab as a graduate student, pursuing his Ph.D. in the Applied Experimental Human Factors program. William has pursued research interests in fields such as: sleep in space, human robot trust, and human performance in driving.

Theresa Kessler

Applied Experimental and Human Factors
Psychology Ph.D. Student

B.Sc. of Psychology, University of Central Florida
theresakessler@knights.ucf.edu
Theresa Kessler CV

Theresa is a 2001 graduate of Nicholls State University with a B.Sc. in Marketing and a 2013 graduate with Honors in the Major of the University of Central Florida with a B.Sc. in Psychology. She joined the MIT2 laboratory in February of 2013 as an undergraduate research assistant under the guidance of Tracy Sanders, and has continued with the laboratory as a graduate student. Her primary areas of research are trust and transparency in human robot interaction.

Kimberly Stowers

Applied Experimental and Human Factors
Psychology Ph.D. Student
University of Central Florida
Department of Psychology
Office: PSY 113A
kimberly_stowers@knights.ucf.edu

Kimberly is a Ph.D. student in the Applied Experimental and Human Factors (AEHF) program at the University of Central Florida, where she conducts research with Dr. Peter Hancock examining human-robot interaction for the Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA). She also works at the Institute of Simulation and Training under the direction of Dr. Jessie Chen conducting research on trust and transparency in human-robot interaction for the Army Research Laboratory under the Autonomy Research Pilot Initiative (ARPI). Kimberly previously spent two years working under the directions of Dr. Eduardo Salas and Dr. Shawn Burke on topics in human factors and industrial/organizational psychology. She has experience researching human-machine systems, human performance measurement, safety analysis, distributed teams, multi-team systems, team training, and culture. Her primary interests lie in the research of human systems, including human-machine teams.

Kimberly believes that service is important for the future of human factors. She is currently serving as the President of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) student chapter, where she strives to benefit both the students of this program as well as up-and-coming students who may be looking for a future in psychology. Kimberly also mentors several undergraduates in the MIT2 lab, and is always open to taking students under her wing for completing directed research projects.